You are here

Seminars

Physics Department Seminar

Investigating the operation and construction of the Gee-Haw Whammy-Diddle

Tri Tran and Dan McGinnis

Location: 
G59
Date of Event: 
Wed, 03/06/2013 - 12:30
Contact info: 
Dr. Gintaras Duda

Physics Department Seminar 03-05-2010

 Development of fluorescent nuclear track detector technology for mixed radiation field dosimetry

Jeff Sykora

Landauer Inc.

Oklahoma State University, Department of Physics

Experiences in a Ph.D. program in physics are one of a kind, focused on but not limited to science. I will talk about my recent adventures transitioning from an undergraduate at Creighton to finishing Ph.D. work at Oklahoma State University. I will also discuss my research summarized below.
Location: 
HL G59
Date of Event: 
Fri, 03/05/2010 - 00:30
Contact info: 
Dr. Jack Gabel

10-03-2008 Physics Seminar - Joey Butterworth

Modeling Ultra Peripheral Collisions

Joey Butterworth

Physics Department, Creighton University

Through the use of Monte Carlo methods, we are able to simulate electromagnetic interactions of nuclei that traveling by one another--Also known as ultra peripheral collisions. This presentation will give a brief look into Monte Carlo methods and how they are applied to the simulation of ultra peripheral collisions.

Location: 
Hixson Lied G59
Date of Event: 
Fri, 10/03/2008 - 12:30
Contact info: 
Dr. Patricia Soto

10-03-2008 Physics Seminar - Lauren Dwyer

The Nuclear Science Merit Badge

Lauren Dwyer

Physics Department, Creighton University

Each March, Creighton University hosts a workshop for local Boy Scouts to learn the uses, applications, and basics of nuclear science. As part of outreach efforts, a webpage has been created that serves as a comprehensive resource for the Nuclear Science Merit Badge for all scouts nationally. The webpage has several features that help a scout complete the badge.

Location: 
Hixson Lied G59
Date of Event: 
Fri, 10/03/2008 - 12:30
Contact info: 
Dr. Patricia Soto

Highlights from the NuSTAR Satellite

Dr. Daniel Stern

Highlights from the NuSTAR Satellite

NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, launched in June 2012, and is the first telescope in orbit to focus high energy X-ray light.  High energy X-ray light provides a unique probe of the most energetic phenomena in the universe, from flares on the surface of the Sun, to the explosions of stars, to the extreme environments around neutron stars and black holes.  NuSTAR has discovered new classes of objects, such as neutron stars accreting at prodigious rates, and has provided uniquely robust measurements of how fast black holes are spinning.  Compared to the previous generation of non-focusing observatories working in this energy band, NuSTAR's change in technology provides 10x sharper images and 100x greater sensitivity.  This talk will present some of the highlights from the NuSTAR mission and describe how they are changing our picture of the extreme universe.

A live stream of the event will be available at http://livestream.com/CreightonUniversity/NuSTAR.

Location: 
Hixson-Lied Science Building G04
Date of Event: 
Tue, 09/08/2015 - 12:30
Contact info: 
Jack Gabel (jackgabel@creighton.edu)

Barak Gruberg Thesis Defense: Studies in Photoproduction of Charm-Anticharm Resonances in Ultra-Peripheral Collisions of Lead Ions in ALICE at the LHC

Abstract: The research presented in this thesis was carried out with the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) LHC (Large Hadron Collider). Two feasibility studies are conducted for Run 2 energies at the LHC. The first case studies the photo-production process of the ηc meson decaying to a four particle final state, π+π-K+K- in Pb-Pb ultra-peripheral collisions (UPCs).

Location: 
Hixson Lied G59
Date of Event: 
Mon, 08/17/2015 - 15:00
Contact info: 
Barak Gruberg or Dr. Michael Cherney

Seminar: How Fast is Ultrafast: Non-Equilibrium Quantum Matter at 10^{-15} s

How Fast is Ultrafast: Non-Equilibrium Quantum Matter at 10-15 s

 

Dr. Jigang Wang

Associate Professor and Staff Scientist
Dept. of Physics, Iowa State University
Materials Science and Engineering Division: Ames Laboratory

The challenge to push the gigahertz (109 hertz) switching speed-limit of today’s logic and magnetic memory devices into the terahertz (1012 hertz) regime underlies the entire field of information processing, storage, communication as well as integrated multi-functional systems. I will discuss to implement an emerging theme: use ultrashort laser pulses to achieve ultrafast control of quantum materials and explore non-equilibrium quantum dynamics at femtosecond (fs, 10-15 s) timescales. This cross-cutting theme has merged different disciplines of current focus including condensed matter physics, quantum materials, ultrafast nonlinear optics, nano-photonics/-electronics... These provide increasing evidence, both from intellectual and practical point of view, on a paradigm shift for modern science and technology to engage ultrafast physics and technology. I will show some snapshots from recent published work from my group [1-5] to meet this ultrafast challenge.

Location: 
Hixson-Lied Science Building G59
Date of Event: 
Thu, 04/30/2015 - 12:30

Seminar: Where is my Quantum Computer?

Dr. Steve Rolston
Professor & Co-Director
Joint Quantum Institute
Dept. of Physics, University of Maryland

Where is My Quantum Computer?

Twenty years ago mathematician Peter Shor proved that a computer based on the laws of quantum mechanics could in principle factor large numbers in polynomial time, a problem believed to be exponentially difficult for classical computation.  Given the importance of this problem to modern cryptography, it understandably stimulated a great deal of excitement and effort.  Dozens of candidate systems have been proposed and many worked on, but we are still many years away from a machine that threatens our financial transactions.  In this talk I will highlight the challenges to build large, controllable systems that maintain their quantum character, and look at where we are, where we will be going, and what we have learned along the way.

Location: 
Hixson-Lied Science Building G59
Date of Event: 
Thu, 04/16/2015 - 12:30
Contact info: 
AndrewBaruth@creighton.edu

Seminar: From Physicist to Patent Lawyer

From Physicist to Patent Lawyer
Matt Poulsen, Ph.D.
Suiter – Swantz pc llo

Patent law represents an intriguing career choice for many in the science and engineering disciplines.  The number of patent applications filed in the U.S. has steadily risen for the past two decades.  With the increased focus on intellectual property by developing economies, such as China and India, U.S. and foreign patent related activity will undoubtedly continue to grow.  Couple this with changing U.S. patent law and the demand for skilled patent attorneys and agents will likely remain strong in the foreseeable future. Not surprisingly, patent attorneys must possess strong technical, reasoning and writing skills.  Physicists are uniquely situated in this regard and will generally find a smooth transition to patent law.  Opportunities exist in patent law for patent attorneys, patent agents, technical advisors and patent examiners working in a broad spectrum of technological areas and settings. These settings include large law firms, boutique law firms, large and small companies, university technology transfer offices and the United States Patent and Trademark Office. 

Matt is currently a patent attorney at Suiter Swantz pc llo and counsels clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to small startups on a variety of intellectual property matters.  In this discussion, he will touch on a variety of patent related topics and provide a general overview of career opportunities in patent law.  He will describe his experience in transitioning from a freshly minted Ph.D. physicist to a patent attorney (including life as a law student) and his personal experiences as a patent attorney, providing a snapshot of what one career path in patent law may look like.

Location: 
Hixson-Lied Science Building G59
Date of Event: 
Thu, 02/19/2015 - 12:30

Seminar: Retrieving the cumulus entrainment rate remotely

Dr. Timothy Wager, Creighton University Department of Physics

Cumulus clouds are an important, yet underobserved, part of the climate system.  As cumuli develop, they mix with the surrounding environment through the process of entrainment, which impacts the lifespan, droplet size, and depth of the clouds. In order to properly simulate the atmosphere for climate and weather forecasting, these impacts must be accounted for but the small spatial extent of these clouds means the entrainment process must be must be parameterized, a difficult problem due in part to the lack of available observations of entrainment.  Entrainment has been traditionally measured via direct penetration of clouds by instrumented aircraft but the expense and difficulty associated with this method means that the scope of the available entrainment observations is small.

To expand the number of observations of entrainment available for analysis, a remote retrieval method using ground-based instrumentation has been developed.  This method, called the Entrainment Rate In Cumulus Algorithm (ERICA) retrieves the fractional entrainment rate through a Gauss-Newton optimal estimation retrieval.  High temporal resolution observations of cumuli and their environment and a guess of the entrainment rate are ingested by a cloud parcel model, in this case the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM).  The entrainment rate is iteratively adjusted until the modeled cloud matches the observations.  ERICA has been shown to correspond well with other methods of retrieving the entrainment rate.  Results for both shallow continental cumulus and deep tropical convection will be shown.

Location: 
Hixson-Lied Science Building G69
Date of Event: 
Thu, 02/12/2015 - 12:30

Pages

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer